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Sorry to have been MIA. I've been working very hard with my business, Henderson Graphic Design & Illustration www.HendersonGDI.com I've also been devoting a lot of time to my other passion, photography and working with the New Kensington Camera Club trying to get a Pennsylvania Historic Marker for Eddie Adams. We've been traveling a lot too, but probably the biggest reason I have been MIA is because of a few rude people, especially this clown from the UK who was not only a racist, but just a twisted little man who got some joy out of urinating on the graves of Irish patriots. I always came to Deviant Art for art, conversation and for inspiration, there are some incredibly talented here, both artists and photographers, many of you while I've never met you personally, I consider friends. I come here to share my art and have creative discussions about art, design and photography. I have no interest in politics, religion or ideology. If you have an agenda that is based on politics or religion and you make derogatory and insulting comments about my art, I will block you and report you.
  • Listening to: Reckless Kelly
  • Reading: Dream Street, W. Eugene Smith's Pittsburgh Project
  • Watching: Breaking Bad reruns
  • Drinking: Coffee
I wrote this a few years ago and it still rings true today...

I learned a long time a go, to try to not burn bridges and to always leave the door open to old friends and lovers. In a lifetime we all make mistakes and there are always more than a few regrets that we tuck away in that hidden spot in our soul that sometimes a sight, a sound, a touch or a taste might allow us to revisit and wonder what if.
New Year is a time to reflect back on mistakes made, loves lost, old friends forgotten. A time to resolve to do better in the coming year. To at least try...
To all my new friends here at DA, my family, my old friends, my colleagues, customers, our Military and our Veterans, Thank You for all that you have given me, I hope you all got something in return from knowing me. Happy New Year!

-Don Henderson
  • Listening to: The Wallflowers
  • Reading: Eddie Adams Vietnam
  • Drinking: Coffee
I got another photo picked by Flickr Explore for the 'Agany' photo I took in Pittsburgh! I love these little surprises! I have no idea how or why they pick the photos they do, but it sure is fun as well as an honor to have people outside my little circle of friends and Flickr contacts see and comment on my photos. www.flickr.com/photos/yankeedo…

Beyond that, my son and I will be working at Eddie Adams Barnstorm this weekend. My son and I were invited by Eddie's widow Alyssa to come up to Jeffersonville, New York to work at Barnstorm. We will be representing the New Kensington Camera Club.

For those of you who don't know, Eddie Adams was a Pulitzer Prize winning photographer from New Kensington in Western Pennsylvania. Eddie was a U.S. Marine during the Korean War. He started his photo journalistic career working for the Valley Daily News Dispatch in New Kensington. He bought his first camera at Ken Kamera also in New Kensington. Eddie's roots are here, but he made his name in Vietnam as a combat photographer working for Assoiated Press. On a fateful day in 1968, Eddie took a photo that would change his life and rocket him to fame with his Siagon Execution photo. The shocking photo, a single click of a shutter on a Leica rangefinder camera almost singlehandedly brought the grime reality of the Vietnam War to the world stage and won him an unwanted Pulitzer Prize for Spot Photogrphy in 1969. It was a photo that change the course of history and led Eddie to refer to his camera as 'an unlikely weapon' as he went on to not only document the war in Southeast Asia, but the floatila of Vietnamese refugees fleeing Vietnam in rickety boats. It was these photos, of Vietnamese Boat People, that Eddie was most proud. Eddie went on to photograph no less than 13 wars in his amazing career. Eddie photograph the famous and not so famous with a genuine down to earth approach that brought out the very best in his subjects while working for numerous publications including Penthouse and Parade Magazine. As a photographer for Parade, Eddie's photos were seen every Sunday by Millions of American's as they sipped their moring coffee. Eddie photographed everyone from Mother Terasa and Mohamad Ali to Louie Armstrong and Clint Eastwood as well popes, president and dictators. Eddie was on top, he was interviewed, he was photographed, he was one of the most respected and talented photographers of our time until he was stricken with ALS. But Eddie's legacy lives on as he continues to mentor and inspire aspiring photo journalists though the Eddie Adams Barnstorm workshops from his farm in New York. Barnstorm brings together the very best photogrphers in photo journalism to mentor the very best up and coming photographers looking to change the world with their photos. An unlikely weapon indeed!
  • Listening to: The Wallflowers
  • Reading: Eddie Adams Vietnam
  • Drinking: Coffee
I just realized that I haven't posed a  journal entry since Steve Jobs died. I have to confess, I've been busy. The company I was working for, Prisma Inc. At H.J. Heinz went out of business at the end of last year, but on my last day, I got a job offer from Schawk!  also at H.J. Heinz, but after 4 months, they decided not to renew my contract. I don't think they like old people. :-) No big deal, I didn't like working for them, too many rules and regulations, not enough creativity, I'm not interested in being a production artist, I'd rather be doing design and creative work. It was a good time to close that chapter, I'm actually happier now than I've been in years. I was never cut out for the corporate world, but I played the game, maybe for too long, but it is what it is and now it's history! I did get to work with some really cool and wonderful people, who I will always value as friends.

So what am I up to now? I'm doing design work for Operation Finally Home, they build custom mortage free homes for wounded Veterans coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan. They do amazing work for amazing and deserving people! It really makes me feel good to be doing something that actually makes a difference in the lives of real people who have given so much for our country. If you'd like to know more about Operation Finally Home, please visit www.operationfinallyhome.com

I'm also exploring one of my other passions, photography... Early last year, my Shane and my good friend Gary Sprague (Purple Flower wallpaper on WindowsXP) got together and started to act on a idea I had to start a camera club. After a chance meeting with Bill Hall and Jim Thomas with the Heritage Museum in Tarentum, the New Kensington Camera Club was born! I was elected the Club's first president and together with the Museum, we have put the ball in motion to have a top notch camera club that will be involved in all aspects of photography. One of our goals is to get a Pennsylvania Historic Marker in New Kensington for Pulitzer Prize winning photographer Eddie Adams who passed away from ALS in 2004. In 2014 he will be eligible for a Historic Marker. To date, we have had to successful photography shows including the first Annnual Eddie Adams Day Photography Festival! The festival included a showing of 21 large Gicleé prints by Eddie Adams, photos by the late Bill Larkin of the Valley News Dispatch, photos by Mychal Watts and a juried show with a $500 first prize. As special guests, we had Eddie's widow Alyssa and their son August Adams as well as fellow Pulitzer Prize winner and Natrona Heights native John Filo!

Needless to say, I've been very busy, the New Kensington Camera club have a very active Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/NewKen… a Flickr group: www.flickr.com/groups/1809756@… We are also on Google+ and we have our own dot org web site at www.nkcameraclub.org ;

If you would like to see some of my latest photos, please visit my Flickr page at:   www.flickr.com/photos/yankeedo…

I promise that I will try to post some new Vector Art here on DA when I get some time.

Reporting live from the Aluminum Capitol of the World...
-YD
  • Listening to: The Wallflowers
  • Reading: Eddie Adams Vietnam
  • Drinking: Coffee
This is a great loss to the creative community. Almost all the artwork I've done since the 1980's is a direct result of Steve Jobs and Apple. Thank God & Copertino. Rest in Peace Steve.
Reporting live from Guntown on a Apple iPad
-YD
  • Listening to: The Wallflowers
  • Reading: Eddie Adams Vietnam
  • Drinking: Coffee
In case anyone was wondering what I've been up to, I've been out shooting pictures a lot lately and posting them to Flicker and Fluidr www.fluidr.com/photos/yankeedo… as part of a project I'm calling the "Guntown Project", I'm also in the very early stages of starting the "New Kensington Camera Club" with some local shooters and friends. The Guntown Project has been a dream of mine for a while, I'm hoping to parlay this into a photography show and possibly a book and to incorporate it into the New Kensington Camera Club. The New Kensington Camera Club idea was inspired by several things, but primarily I want it to be a educational tool for people interested in photography, with the hope that we can one day contribute to turning things around in our economically depressed town and surrounding area with gallery shows and special events that will highlight people and places here and around Guntown. I've seen where artist and creative types have turned depressed areas around and sparked revitalization and community pride and with that comes jobs and hope! We could all use a little of that!

The Guntown Project: www.flickr.com/groups/1611713@…
The New Kensington Camera Club: www.facebook.com/#!/home.php?s…

Reporting live from the heart of the Golden Triangle...
-YD
  • Listening to: The Wallflowers
  • Reading: Eddie Adams Vietnam
  • Drinking: Coffee
As a fan, we invest a lot of time money and emotion into supporting the team of our choice. Some go to extremes, others take a more stable approach to supporting the team. Being from Pittsburgh automatically puts you into a category of extreme fan that puts the fan in fanatic. Not all of us fit the extremes, but they get all the press and end up being the painted face of Steelers fans. Most of us are a little more moderate in our support, we support the home team for city pride and a sense of belonging. Supporting the team has become an institution even a religion, they eat, drink and sleep the Black & Gold, to them there is nothing else but Steelers 24-7, for others like myself, when the season is over, like the abrupt and unsatisfying end yesterday in the less than Super Bowl, the season is over. At the end of the day, it's only sports. We need to get back to life and move on. Congratulations to Green Bay! Enjoy the win! The Steelers left a lot on the field, but came up short, better luck next year.
  • Listening to: The Essential Mary Chapin Carpenter
  • Reading: Hot Shots
  • Drinking: Coffee
Maybe it's the lack of sunshine and the life sustaining Vitamin D, but this time of year I always get a sense of melancholy. Couple that with this urban decay fascination I've been developing and you get where I'm at in this space and time. It's not all bad, I've gained an appreciation for the run down, the rusty, the grim and the abandoned in life. I recently found on Flickr that there are others like me who love the decaying storefronts and the dilapidated buildings of our decaying inner cities and mill towns, while it's sad, it is also inspiring in the way in that people are going out there and photographing every rusty nuance and turning it into photographic art and giving the decay new life. We are recording a life well lived and making art out of the "Patina of Life". It's all good.

Reporting live from the heart of the rusty triangle...
-YD

Go Steelers!
  • Listening to: The Essential Mary Chapin Carpenter
  • Reading: Hot Shots
  • Drinking: Coffee
Christmas is a season of giving that celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ, but in this season we sometimes lose focus, it can be overwhelming in the mad rush. I myself dropped out many years ago due to the commercialization of the holiday, it's not that I don't celebrate the birth of Christ, but I just don't get involved in the shopping and all the craziness that seems to start earlier and earlier every year...

A friend of mine, Paul Tibbets is a pilot in the USAF, the other day he posted a message about wishing he could be with his family for Christmas and I got to thinking about all our troops that are far from home serving our country and all the generations that did the very same thing in all the past wars to protect our freedom.

Another friend John DeCillo, a Vietnam Vet asked me if the was something I could do to remind everybody about all our troops away from home and it reminded me of a photo taken of my dad during the Korean War. The photo shows him sitting at a small table in a tent staring at a photo of my mom. The photo was taken at the 58th Ordnance Ammo Compamny's Ammo Dump that supplied the 8th Army, Sihung, Korea, December 1953.

yankeedog.deviantart.com/art/C…

Please at this time of year, take a moment and say a small prayer of thanks for their service and thank God for them and pray for their safety and their safe return to their families and friends.

Merry Christmas!
Reporting live from the Aluminum Christmas Tree and Festivus Pole capital of the world, New Kensington, PA...


Merry Christmas to All!
-YD  

yankeedog.deviantart.com/favou…
  • Listening to: Weezer Christmas CD
  • Reading: Pittsburgh Trib
  • Watching: History Channel
  • Drinking: Coffee
This time of year (Thanksgiving here in the U.S.A.) we are always asked to reflect upon things we are thankful for. First and foremost I have to say family and friends and this includes people like you if you are reading this. We may only be friends on the internet, but you all are important to me. Your praise, comments and insight of my work means so much to me and inspires me to do more. I also appreciate you sharing your work and your thoughts, I am very grateful. Think about what a wondrous thing this... Yesterday after posting some photos, I got :+fav:'s from Belgium, Canada, Egypt, Pakistan, Portugal and Spain! How cool is that? Think about how ominous it is to shoot a photo here in Pittsburgh on my way to lunch, come back to work, post them and have people halfway around the world see it and appreciate it, wow! THANKS!

With that being said, I want to thank God for the talent to be creative both as an artist and a amateur photographer, it allows me to have so much fun in life and to meet so many cool and talented people!

HAPPY THANKSGIVING! I'm thankful for all of you!

Reporting live from the heart of the Golden Triangle...
-YD
  • Listening to: House of Pain
  • Reading: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
  • Watching: Sons of Anarchy
  • Drinking: Coffee
I'm not a photographer, but I do like to take pictures. Being an artist, maybe gives me a better than average eye for composition and drama, but at the end of the day, I'm just a graphic designer who likes to take pictures. It appears I'm not alone in my passion for taking pictures of things I think are cool and this new group on Flickr proves it. www.flickr.com/groups/graphicd… Graphic Designers Moonlighting as Photographers. I would never say that I'm moonlighting as a photographer, there is much more to photography than snapping pictures, but I have been paid to take pictures, nothing high end, mostly just something to help somebody get through a project or PowerPoint presentation here at Heinz, but paid is paid. There really is no substitute for a trained and experienced photographer, they can make or break a project with their skills and expertise, however there is a widening gray area out there where a person with a good eye and a decent camera can take a good shot and that shot could be used in a advertisement or in some other commercial way.

Graphic designer are realizing more and more that everything is not cut and dry when it come to the photography we use, some of the edgy cool stuff isn't being done by real photographers, but by people who have an eye for the unique, they are shooting with all kinds of digital and film cameras, even cell phones! Photography is really like the Wild West these days and it's is coming from a variety of different sources that don't necessarily have the credentials to be a "Photographer", but the desire to take photos and being in the right spot at the right time with a camera can overcome a lot of the things, just try to get the shot in focus and you never know, you could end up recording a defining moment in time or a special thing that somebody may just want to buy it. Keep shooting, but more importantly, have fun...

Reporting live for the heart of the Steeler Nation...
-YD
  • Listening to: Reckless Kelly
  • Reading: INVADER Magazine
  • Watching: Terriers
  • Drinking: Coffee
We all have things we want to do, places to visit, things we would like to possess... If you are a collector like me, you have a wish list. Many of the things on my wish list for some reason are cameras, it drives my wife crazy, but I'm always looking for old cameras, working or paperweights it doesn't matter much to me, I'm not buying them to take pictures with, but to take pictures of. Back in the day when I was a art student at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, I had a photography class, not having much money, I borrowed a old Pentax Spotmatic from my uncle with the instructions to use it till it dies. I really loved that camera. My uncle "Hink", my dad's oldest brother was so cool, he had served in the 8th Air Force in WWII as a waist gunner on a B-17 called the Wild Hare, he was a bit of a wild hare himself and always had lots of great adventures stories to tell, he was a lot of fun. He also had lots of great cameras and when he heard I was taking photography in art school, he showered me with lots of photography annuals and books as well as lending me the perfect camera for a young photography student to cut his teeth on. I used that old Spotmatic to shoot my first Black & White photos and by the time it crapped out, I had saved enough to buy my own used Pentax Spotmatic II. I returned the old Spotmatic my uncle lent me, although now I wished I had kept it. I don't know what ever happened to it, years ago my uncle had a stroke and eventually passed away, my cousins never mentioned his cameras and I never asked, I often think about that old Spotmatic and the first pictures I took with it. That old camera is on my wish list.

Reporting live from Guntown...
-YD
  • Listening to: Flogging Molly
  • Reading: Lomo Magazine
  • Watching: Law & Order
  • Drinking: Coffee
From time to time we come face to face with the burden of life. We've all heard the expression that the Good Lord never gives us more than we can handle, but sometimes I wonder. I recently learned that a photographer I've gotten to know has been given a pretty grim diagnosis. Coupled with some other serious health issues, he is already carrying a pretty substantial weight. The human condition in all its amazement has little more than prayer and spirit to fight the constant barrage of life threatening maladies. Its like the dodge ball game of life, the person next to you takes a hit and the game goes on. You think I'm glad it wasn't me... and the only place you find sympathy is between shit and suicide in the dictionary. It's a cruel world, but it doesn't have to be that way, we all have the capacity to ease the burden on our fellow travelers, sometimes the littlest things can make the difference, a kind word, a smile,a simple gesture of understanding, a hand up, not a hand out, some praise, a compliment, holding a door open, offering a seat on the bus or train, letting somebody go first, even just the words thank you and you're welcome can mean so much. In this world it's easy just to say f*ck this and move on, it takes a lot of dedication to try to change things, to try to make the world a better place... I know I've preached this before, but pay it forward, it makes a difference. And while I have a sympathetic ear, please say a prayer for my photographer friend Tony, he can sure use it.

Reporting live and paying it forward from deep in the heart of the Steel City...
-YD
  • Listening to: The Band
  • Reading: JPG Magazine
  • Watching: Sons of Anarchy
  • Drinking: Coffee
Over the past couple weeks for one reason or another, I've been presented with the opportunity to shot some photos that even though they were taken now, they could have been taken many years ago. Cameras are like time machines in a way. When you have the chance to photograph something in it's natural setting, when there are none of the trappings of a more modern era, you can transport the viewer back in time. I have often said that I wish I could go back in time to say the 1930's with modern cameras and photograph the Pennsylvania Railroad in all its glory. It is possible to achieve some degree of timelessness if the conditions are right and you are aware of the uniqueness of a given situation. A few weeks ago on the way back from visiting the 122nd Fighter Squadron we stopped in Ohio to see the Ohio Caverns, parked out front there were 2 Model T Fords! In a couple of the shots I took, I was almost able to achieve a time machine moment. Over the weekend we were at the the Penn's Colony Festival, while there were a lot of people walking a round in modern clothing, it was still possible to get some time machine shots.

To take it to the next level, photographers like my FaceBook friend Peter Lerro set up these elaborate charters with so much attention to detail that you are literally swept back to another place in time www.lerroproductions.com/chart… Period cars, actors and actresses in period costumes in places that haven't changed since the the 1930 or even earlier... it's magic. Couple that with maybe shooting with a vintage camera on film, the possibilities are timeless.

So the next time you are out shooting keep in mind to look for shots that could have possibly been taken in another era, let your camera be a time machine and please let me see what you can come up with. Happy shooting!

Reporting live from the old Gimbles Department Store in Downtown Pittsburgh...
-YD
  • Listening to: Marshal Tucker Band
  • Reading: JPG Magazine
  • Watching: Sons of Anarchy
  • Drinking: Coffee
The other day my good friend Chris was on the beach in Cape May New Jersey when a P-51 Mustang came flying down the beach and he told me he wished he had his camera. Walking down the street yesterday, I saw a girl taking a picture of one of the churches across the street from the Heinz 57 Center and it occurred to me that in no other period in time has the world we live in been more documented than it is right now. I don't care where you are or what you are doing, someone is taking a photo. Everybody today has some sort of camera, be it a camera phone or a point and shoot or a DSLR or any number of analogue cameras that are still clicking away, everything from Holgas to Polaroids and Fuji instant cameras... people are taking photos in unprecedented numbers, it's mind boggling. What's amazing too is the quality and variety of the images. When I hear somebody say "I wish I'd have had a camera", I have to ask why didn't you? When you have cell phones taking 5 to 8 MP photos and point and shoots that will fit in the palm of your hand there is just no excuse for not taking a picture.

Back when I was a art student at the Carnegie Institute, my instructor Joe Fitzpatrick used to tell us "Look to see to remember to enjoy". Part of that was in recording what we saw by drawing sketches and making notes. That's what it's all about. Today camera makes it easy to capture those moments. Cameras are like mini time machines that can transport us back to both happy and sad times, they can record the joys and tragedies of life and death. The camera is eye witness to all that is around us in this great and wondrous world we live in. Just shoot it...

Reporting live and taking pictures in Pittsburgh...
-YD
  • Listening to: Jackson Browne Live
  • Reading: Wrangler TJ manual
  • Watching: NCIS
  • Drinking: Ice Water
Wow, what a great weekend! Beautiful weather and lots of things to do in and around Pittsburgh! Saturday we toured a WWII LST in Pittsburgh! My uncle Tommy Henderson served on LST 598 in WWII. Hundreds of LST's were built here in Pittsburgh during WWII at Neville Island and at Ambridge. My grandfather a WWI vet helped build LSTs at DRAVO Corporation on Neville Island on the Ohio River. LST (Landing Ship Tank) or as my uncle called them "Large Slow Target" were mass produced amphibious assault ships and were used during the D-Day invasions and during the island hopping campaign in the Pacific. The one we toured LST 325 out of Evansville, Indiana could carry 20 Sherman Tanks a couple hundred Marines, trucks, Jeeps and supplies right up to the beach and then go back out to sea. www.lstmemorial.org/

On Labor Day we visited Tour Ed Mine. The Tour Ed Mine was an actual working coal mine that toady is an educational facility that teaches about coal mining from it's early days with pick and shovels up to the modern era with continuous mining machines. We went a mile and a half ride 160 ft underground to learn the very dangerous work of coal mining. Our guide was an actual working coal miner who talked about the the dangers and hardships of the American coal miner. You really begin to appreciate working above ground after spending a shot time underground. www.tour-edmine.com/

Reporting live from the Aluminum City...
-YD
  • Listening to: Jackson Browne Live
  • Reading: Wrangler TJ manual
  • Watching: NCIS
  • Drinking: Ice Water
The other day I bought a used 2003 Jeep Wrangler TJ. This the 8th Jeep I've owned, still have numbers 5 and 7 as well, you can never have enough Jeeps. The latest one is pretty cool, it's a Limited Edition called a Freedom, it has the tried and true 4.0 liter Inline 6 with a 5 speed, rag top, hard doors, chrome wheels and a few other goodies and it's as stock as stock can be! If you have ever shopped around for a used Jeep Wrangler, you know how rare it is to not only find a stock one, but to find one in showroom condition is next to impossible, but I found one! Learning to drive a Wrangler TJ as opposed to a Wrangler YJ is a learning experience, a lot has changed with the Wrangler between 1995 and 2003. In 1997, (there was no 1996 Wrangler) the Wrangler got a total redo with the TJ. New body, more creature comforts, a much smoother ride, a rag top that can come be folded up in minutes... I'll always like the raw feel of the Wrangler YJ, but this is growing on me.  

A funny story that I want to relate... On the way home from work yesterday the Engine Malfunction light came on, so this morning I took it to the shop to have it checked out, no big deal, a sensor, it's covered and they are fixing it, in the meantime they give me a vehicle to drive, a Chrysler Mini Van! Who ever said that you are what you drive? How do you go from driving a very cool little red Jeep Wrangler one minute to a Mini Van the next? I have to admit, as much as I feel out of place driving a Mini Van, the thing runs great, but it just ain't me.

Reporting Live from the Golden Triangle...
-YD
  • Listening to: Jackson Browne Live
  • Reading: Wrangler TJ manual
  • Watching: NCIS
  • Drinking: Ice Water
We're back from our trip Texas with Operation Finally Home. We had a great time, got to see all kinds of cool things and meet some really cool people. Dan Wallrath the founder of Operation Finally Home, Dan Vargas and Cindy Schoening are amazing people doing an amazing job for our wounded troops, I'm really proud to be a part of the cause! Thank you so much for inviting us to Texas and giving us a first hand look at what you guys do.

Some details of the trip included a Houston Dynamo professional soccer game that honored our military and spotlighted Dan Wallrath and some of our wounded Veterans! Budwiser provided a great tailgate party and a $5000 check for Operation Finally Home!

The next day I went with Dan Vargas to attend a pre concert organizational meeting with folks who run the Pasadena Rodeo! These folks did a stellar job organizing everything from parking to mosquito eradication! Everything is bigger in Texas and mosquitoes are no exception. Also fire ants are a serious threat too as my wife found out while at a park at Clearlake.

After the meeting with the Pasadena Rodeo crew, it was on to a radio simulcast in Houston with Jim Dutton at Tile Outlet. Jim does a home improvement show on KTRH News Radio. I helped Cindy set up the Operation Finally Home table and Dan did an interview with Jim about Operation Finally Home. It never ceases to amazes me the generosity of people when it comes to our veterans. Texans are about the proudest and most patriotic people I've ever met. I even met a guy from Pittsburgh working there named Stan McCarthy, Steeler fans are everywhere!

The Concert with Ted Nugent was on Sunday. The folks at the Pasadena Rodeo had everything ready for the event that included things to do for the kids and adults. The VIP area had lots of food & drink as well as exhibits. Bands played throughout the day culminating with the main acts, the Charlie Lucas Band followed by the Motor City Madman Ted Nugent. Ted is as wacky as he ever was, acting more like a teenager than a 62 year old man, the guy can still rock and has tons of raw energy. We unfortunately missed the chance to meet and greet with Ted because we took a ride on a tracked military transport from the Texas Military Museum! Oh well, he's coming to Pittsburgh later this month, maybe then. His right wing politics aside, he did get 5,000 people to come out to the concert and that money raised will go directly into building homes for our wounded warriors!

Speaking of the homes for our wounded warriors, we visited with Donny Daughenbaugh, USMC, his wife Sarah and their 2 kids in their new home. Donny was wounded in Iraq and has a bullet lodged near the base of his skull. The homes being built by Operation Finally Home are beautiful and want for very little other than some personal touches that the Daughenbaugh's are already adding to make it their own. Donny and Sarah are wonderful people and I wish them many happy years in their new home. These homes are mortgage free and the state of Texas takes 30% off property taxes for veterans!   

Some of the places we visited in the Houston/Galveston area are worth noting... Galveston Island even though it is still rebuilding after the devastating visit by Hurricane Ike a few years ago is a wonderful place with many unique and beautiful buildings and monuments. If you go, take the Ducky tour, it's well worth it. George our driver was most informative. Seawolf Park is a interesting place with a great view of Galveston Bay with all it's activity. The main feature of Seawolf Park is the submarine USS Cavalla and the Destroyer Escort USS Stewart. Both vessels are WWII Veterans. On board the Calalla, we met a nice kid who was helping his dad paint in the coning tower. He gave us a nice tour of the sub and really surprised me when I told him about the sub we have in Pittsburgh. He got this sad look on his face and went on to tell me how much he loved the Steelers! When we left he yelled God bless the Steelers and God bless Pittsburgh! Texans are just amazing people! We visited the NASA Johnson Space Center, it was interesting, but I don't have much interest in that sort of thing. If you go, skip the one hour tram tour, especially if it's hot. The highlight of the tour for me had nothing to do with space. There is a herd of Texas Long Horns at NASA! Incredible beasts, they don't call them Long Horns for nothing. The Clearlake area where we stayed is really nice, lots of water, lots of boats and for our visit, we had nothing but blue skies! One place you have to visit down here is the Kemah Boardwalk, Kemah means "Wind in the Face" and it didn't disappoint. Kemah has lots of cool shops, restaurants and things to do including an amusement park with an old school roller coaster and an observation tower with outstanding views of Galveston Bay. The food at the Lighthouse Buffet was excellent! The last place we visted before heading out of town on Southwest was the San Jacinto Monument and the Battleship USS Texas, I wish I could have spent more time there, but home was calling. We had a great time in Texas, I want to thank Dan Wallrath, Dan Vargas, Cindy Schoening, the wounded Veterans and their families, the Houston Dynamo, Budwiser, the Pasadena Rodeo, all the voluteers, Charlie Lucas Band, Ted Nugent and the people of Texas for making our visit so much fun! God bless you'all!

Reporting live from the heart of the Aluminum City...
-YD
  • Listening to: WDSY-FM Country
  • Reading: Bloomfield
  • Watching: American Gangster
  • Drinking: Green Iced Tea
For the past couple years, I have been doing artwork for the Bay Area Builders Association, Operation Finally Home and my friend Dan Vargas. Operation Finally Home was started by Dan Wallrath www.cnn.com/2010/LIVING/03/11/…

Next week I'm going to get to meet Dan Wallrath and some of the wounded Vets. I'll also be meeting Ted Nugent and seeing him in concert. I'll also be seeing my friend Dan Vargas again. www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvMxRA…

To learn how you can help build homes for our wounded warriors go to www.babasupport.org/
Thanks for reading this and watching the above videos and while you are watching them, note the banners and signs are some of my handy work. Here is the concert poster:
fav.me/d2rdisb

Reporting live from the heart of the Steel City and heading to Galveston TX...
-YD
  • Listening to: The Workers Song by Dick Gaughan
  • Reading: Rails to Pittsburgh
  • Watching: CNN Heroes
  • Drinking: Green Iced Tea
I'm Always Amazed at the incredible amount of talent that I see here on Deviant Art. You would figure in 33 years doing graphic design and illustration and over 7 years here on DA that I've pretty much seen it all. I get so inspired and at the same time I'm in awe of what I see as well as being more than a little frustrated when I think of some of the talentless slobs who are making big bucks. Still I have great hope when I see such amazing work. Check my favorite to see what I mean!
Reporting live from the heart of the Golden Triangle...
-YD
  • Listening to: "Oh Mary" live at Le Petit Theatre
  • Reading: Rails to Pittsburgh
  • Watching: Theresa Anderson on Youtube
  • Drinking: Green Iced Tea